Jayne Regan

Jayne Regan was a debutante-wants-to-become-star type – a pretty girl from upper echelons of society who acts because she likes it, not because she needs it or because she is passionate about the art. Her career, although slim, still exceeds the careers of many other like minded debutantes, as she actually played leading roles (in low budget westerns, but still!). Let’s learn more about her!

EARLY LIFE

Augusta Jane Stoffregen was born on July 28, 1910, in St. Louis, Missouri, to  Herman C. Stoffregen and Anna Hartmann, both of German ancestry. Her older brother Carl was born 1905. Augusta came from a prestigious family – her father was a socially prominent and quite wealthy coffee importer. The family always employed at least one maid.

Augusta was a precocious, energetic child that was a holy terror to her parents and everybody around her by the ti,me she was 10 years old – as a passionate tomboy, she was constantly falling in trouble and getting injured. Fittingly, she was nicknamed Bobbie by her peers, and the nickname stuck her whole life. However, as she mature,d it was clear that Bobbie was a knockout, a truly pretty girl. Combine this with her family’s prestige and wealth, and Bobbie was a fixture on the local St. Louis social scene, being a much laded debutante that seemingly had it all – looks, money and charm.

After finishing high school, Augusta went on to study at the Washington University in St. Louis. She was popular on the campus with the boys, and was named Queen of the School of Engineering. Unfortunately, other female coeds shunned her – was it jealously or something more, it’s impossible to say. Bobbie was also a pretty reckless driver – in 1932, a verdict of $3,500 for personal injuries was brought against her before a jury Circuit Court by F. E. Schellenberg, who claimed he was injured when a truck he was driving with an automobile driven by Bobbie. She also enjoyed Welch’s, the local bar. “After a particularly arduous exam or a dry lecture,” she told the papers “Welch’s is ideal for “bucking one up.’ It’s fine to add flavor to fruit punches too.”

Bobbie graduated from Washington in 1932. Two years later she met noted director Cecil B. de Mille at a social function in St. Louis. Cecil was a man with a keen eye for beauty and talent, and he advised her to try a movie career – he would help of course. This meeting resulted in Augusta’s admittance to the Twentieth-Century-Fox stock school, and of her career went up!

CAREER

Before I make a more through analysis, I have to say that Jayne appeared in her fair share of low budget westerners I will not write about, just list them: Ridin’ ThruWest on ParadeTerror of the PlainsThe Cactus Kid and Texas Jack. Nuff said about that.

Jayne also appeared, thankfully, in other genres. She started her career in 1932 in Cleopatra, a De CeMille movie from a time when he was sexy and edgy and not didactic and overblown, like many of his later works. And the cast, the superb cast! Claudette Colbert, Henry Wilcoxon, Warren William (I love that man!!), C. Aubrey Smith and the list goes on! Wonderful, and if you want a epic movie, this one is for you!

In 1935, after some dismaying westerns, Jayne appeared in One More Spring, a charming. bittersweet drama about homeless people living in Central Park, played by Janet Gaynor and Warner Baxter. Then came Dante’s Inferno, a measly Spencer Tracy drama, most notable for being a showcase for the dancing skills of young Rita Hayworth.

In 1936, Jayne was in Ladies in Love, one of the famous three girls seeking  husbands subgenre. The genre thrived all the way until the 1960s, with movies like Three Coins in a Fountain, The best of everything and the Pleasure Seekers. This one is even a bit above average, with Janet Gaynor, Loretta Young and Constance Bennett as the eponymous trio. And one of the man is played by Tyrone Power, whauza! The same year Jayne had a credited but smaller role in the too cute for your teeth Shirley Temple movie, Stowaway, where Shirley play, you guessed it, a stowaway!

Jayne was one of the many dancers who appeared in the Sonja Henie musical, Thin Ice (the less I write about Henie, the better). The year was 1937, and Jayne also appeared in This Is My Affair, a typical romance/drama with Robert Taylor and Barbara Stanwyck. What can I say, she had the acting chops, he had the looks, and together they made it push somehow. Joking aside, Babs was a much better actress than her hubby, and it shows, but their chemistry sizzles! The story is bland and predictable, with Taylor playing the same old boring hero, appointed by then President McKinley to uncover the band that systematically robs banks. Much more interesting in his role is Brian Donlevy as a bad guy. All in all, a meh-meh movie.

Jayne then appeared in You Can’t Have Everything, a typical Alice Faye musical. So, what makes an Alice Faye musical? Well, just one thing – it’s a movie where where Alice Faye plays Alice Faye. No matter what her name is, it’s always just her. Everything else is more or less secondary. The came a subpar romantic comedy, Wife, Doctor and Nurse, where Warner Baxter is the doctor, Loretta Young the wife and Virginia Bruce the nurse. And now guess the story! Formulaic entertainment for sure, but not a particularly bad one.

Jayne was finally credited again in Second Honeymoon, a same old, same old Tyrone Power/Loretta Young vehicle. She plays a beautiful young divorce who stumbled upon her former playboy husband just after getting married for the second time. Just In a few years Tyrone would gradate to swashbucklers, and Loretta would slowly go towards more serious drama, but this is a paper thin, very light calorie movie. While not bad, it’s not very good either.

Jayne appeared in two Mr. Moto movies,. Thank You, Mr. Moto and Mr. Moto’s Gamble. A bit more interesting was Walking Down Broadway, a overtly dramatic but female-centric movie about 6 chorus girls that have a get together years after the show they appeared in closed. It has a solid female cast (Claire Trevor, Lynn Bari, Phyllis Brooks, Dixie Dunbar…), and is an unusual movie of the period, so definitely worth watching. Similarly good was Josette, a sophisticated comedy about two young men trying to wrest their father from the clutches of a gold digger but by mistake think the woman is a young nightclub singer with whom they both fall in love. The woman is played by Simone Simon, and the men were Don Ameche and Robert Young, and it’s a charming old comedy. Then came Always Goodbye, a soapy, weepy but ultimately satisfying Barbara Stanwyck melodrama.

Jayne had her last starring role in White tiger, a low budget and lackluster jungle movie. That’s it – you know the type, bad sets, no acting, implausible plot, just set in a jungle and with an exotic slant. Jayne last movie was Keep Smiling, a charming Jane Withers vehicle. And that was it from Jayne!

PRIVATE LIFE

Jayne was 5 feet 4 inches in height, weighted 111 pounds, and had brown hair and grey-brown eyes. She was also very superstitious, loved to golf and played it often, and got terrible scores. She was painted in the papers as a St. Louis debutante who forsook the glittering society of the Midwestern city and came west to break into the movies and really wanted to act. She used to say “I’m really sincere in wanting to work in motion pictures, but I suppose the producers just don’t realize it.”

Here is a short background on Jayne:

She particularly likes historical biographies. Jayne also sketches and designs some of her own clothes. She’s written a lot of short stories none of which she has sold and has been trying to do a novels. She had hopes of becoming a topline singer but, after studying for some time, was convinced that she would miss the upper rung of the operatic ladder by some distance. Then she chucked music aside and now sings only in the shower. She and her mother have a Hollywood apartment and three or four times a year her father spends a couple of months out here with them.

Jayne made minimal newspaper coverage .She dated J. F. T. O’Connor, Controller of the Currency, for a time, but they didn’t get to the altar.

Bobbie married Jarrell Emmett Gose on December 18, 1937. Jarrell was born on October 29, 1901, in Wise County, Texas, to Stehphen Mathus Gose and Ollie Allie Jarrell. He was married to Kittie West SCHREINER in 1927, but divorced her by 1935. He left Texas for Los Angeles in the early 1930s, became a production manager at Twentieth-Century-Fox studio.

Not long after their marriage, Jarrell gave up movies to work as an independent oil distributor and real estate broker. Following suit, Jayne also gave up her film work to become a housewife.

The Goses lived a normal life in California until their 1951 divorce. It seems that the divorce turned nasty at some point:

Jarrell E. Gose. 43. real-estate broker, yesterday blamed his mother-in-law for failure of his marriage but his wife, Jayne B. Gose, 41, former film actress, said he drank too much. In court of Superior Judge William S. Baird, where their contested divorce hearing is under way, Mrs. Gose said her husband borrowed large sums of money from her to use in his business but that he did not work. She asked that the court order the money returned. trial, in which Gose’s main grievance is mother-in-law. Gose complained that Mrs. Stoffregen would not speak to him, or even to his relatives. Through Atty. Royal M. Calvin, he asked that the family home at 11121 Montana St, West Los Angeles, and its furnishings, be declared jointly his. Mrs. Gose said she was known in films as Jayne Regan.

In the end, Jarrell won the right to keep his portable bar, and was also awarded a radio, piano and violin. Funny.

Jayne wasted no time in getting married again – she married Milo Monroe Turner on August 8, 1952, in Los Angeles or Monterey. Turner was born on July 26, 1916, in Mason City, Nebraska, to Milo Turner and Kathryn Monroe. His younger sister Reta was born in 1919. Sadly, his father died a few months before his sister was born, in December 1918. His mother remarried to a Karl Losey, had another son, Karl, in 1921, and died in 1925. Milo and his siblings were raised in Shawnee, Kansas, and then he moved to Los Angeles. He served during WW2 in the US Army, and ultimately became a Lieutenant. After his return from war, he became as a stock broker in Los Angeles.

Long retired from Hollywood by now, Jayne enjoyed a life away from the spotlight and didn’t make any newspaper headlines, so information about her life from 1953 until her death are scarce. She occasional returned to her hometown, St. Louis, often for film festivals, to talk about her film career, and lived with her husband in Anaheim, California, for a time.

Jayne Regan Turner died on March 19, 2000,in Redlands, California.

Milo Monroe Turner died on May 15, 2002, in Riverside, California.

 

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