Millicent Deming

millicentdeming

Young, pretty Millicent Deming proved to be a more apt businesswoman than she was an actress – she worked in a modeling agency as a tutor from her late teens, and later was successful in real estate and had her very own modeling agency. too bad her acting career was so thin… Let’s find out more about her…

EARLY LIFE

Millicent Louise Deming was born on June 12, 1933, in Los Angeles, California, to Robert Edwards Deming and Mildred Fulton. Her father came from a progressive Iowa family – his older brother was William Edwards Deming, a prominent 20th century engineer, statistician, professor, author, lecturer, and management consultant. Robert worked as a super service station proprietor (I have no idea what it is, but it’s written like this on the 1930 census so go figure?)

Millicent grew up in a upper middle class family in Los Angeles, and discovered her love for acting from an early age. Here is a short article about her social life from the late 1940s:

Visitors Coming from Bel Air to attend the junior-senior prom at [shadow Mountain Club tonight is pretty Millicent Deming, who will be squired by Kenny Jackson of P. S. High. Miss Deming has taken junior parts in several movie shorts, one of which was shot down here at the airport with Kenny playing opposite her. She will he the house guest of Mrs. Mildred Jackson

Millicent became a successful businesswoman early in her life, before she graduated from high school. Her father opened a modeling school where she worked as a instructor, giving girls lessons in how to be feminine and pose for the camera. On the side, she also worked as a secretary for famous impresario Nils Grauland, and did a nightly KTSL (2) show. She met the right people, and it was only a matter of time before she landed in Hollywood.

CAREER

Millicent’s first movie was Two Tickets to Broadway, the all too familiar musical with tons of unknown actresses playing chorus girls (I think that about 7 or 8 actresses I profiled here actually had an uncredited role in that movie). There is nothing much to say about it, it’s a lower mid tier musical with a moronic story, colorful cinematography and sadly forgettable music. Skip.

Millicent’s second, much better movie, was The Garment Jungle, a bag of mixed pleasures. Basically a racket movie, it’s part film noir with dramatic touches, a so-so mesh of it’s two directors – Vincent Sherman and Robert Aldrich. And boy, we can hardly find two such disparate directors!Sherman was known as a woman’s director in the vein of George Cukor – he excelled in melodrama and worked with great divas like Miriam Hopkins, Joan Crawford and Bette Davis. Robert Aldrich was the master of unseen violence, one of the few directors that showed what a phantom menace looks like. Combine them and you have an interesting experiment – not a completely successful one, mind you. The movie, which ended up begin completely unknown afterwards – has flashes of brilliance as much as some truly dismal parts. The story is nothing to gape about – racketeering in the garment district of New York – but it works as a framing device for some very relevant questions and punches you hard when you finally realize that those things happened in real life. Oh yes, people literary died in these rackets. The actors are a mixed bag too. There are wonderful actors like Lee J. Cobb and , and on the other hand, we have Kerwin Matthews in the lead, handsome enough but a total wooden pole. However, the atmosphere and the style overall is superb. There is much “angry silence”, menace and doom in the air, and you can easily feel that Robert Aldrich did a large portion of the movie. It’s his signature style – brutal yet always subtle. Sherman infuses the more “intimate parts”, and they are lacking compared to the rest of the movie. The female love interest, played by Gia Scala, is so marginal to the story it’s almost sad, and Matthews was too thin an actor to truly pull of the more challenging gentle scenes. If you could pull out the redundant cheesy side of the movie, It’s almost a wonderful film noir, and it’s a shame it so neglected today, despite it’s shortcomings.

Millicent did some TV work (Peter Gunn) before retiring from acting for good.

PRIVATE LIFE

Millicent was 34-23-34, blonde haired, hazel Eyed, and 5’ 6”. In 1951, at just 18 years old, Millicent was engaged to Serge Ross, a Hollywood stalwart. The engagement was terminated, and she was seen around town with well known attorney Milton Golden.

Millicent married John Anthony Restifo on May 5, 1953. Restifo was born on December 30, 1916, in Washington DC, to Thomas Charles Restifo and Madeleine DiCamillo. He was the oldest of four children (John, Joseph, Nancy and Margaret). His father, who ran a successful beverage business, died sometime in the late 1930s. His mother took over as the head of the business, running it with John and his brother Joseph. John moved to Los Angeles a few years later, along with his mother, and there met Millicent. Little is known of the marriage. They divorced in the late 1950s or early 1960s. Sadly, Restifo died in Mexico in 1964.

Millcent married, secondly, to Gerald Fishbein on January 29, 1964. Fishbein was born on March 12, 1930, to Joseph Fishbein and Esther Levin. His younger sister Joan was born in 1940. His father was a successful jewelry salesman – they always had a servant in the household. His parents moved to New York not long after his birth. They lived in Queens where Gerald grew up. Gerald returned to California at some point. Millicent and Gerald’s only child, daughter Leslie, was born on March 17, 1966. After living n Los Angeles with a lofty social life, Millicent and Gerald divorced on December 22, 1982. He married Emily S. Adehlson in 1985 and continued living in California.

Millcent married her third husband, William T. Reynolds, on April 6, 1985.  Born in Trenton, New Jersey, February 11, 1923, to parents William Titus Reynolds, Sr. and Mary Knode Reynolds, he attended schools in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Florida before moving to California following service in the Pacific Theatre during World War II. He was a graduate of the University of Southern California with a B.S. in Finance (Magna Cum Laude), and an M.B.A. He had a long career in financial services. While in graduate school, he was employed by Hill Richards & Co. in Los Angeles. In Pasadena, he was broker/manager at Blyth & Co., later Blyth Eastman Dillon, Paine Webber and, finally, UBS. He was a Past President of the Bond Club. Reynolds was married once before, to Mary Electa Nehman, and they had three daughters: Cornelia, (born on June 30, 1948), Electa (born on October 28, 1950), and Rosemary (born on May 12, 1953).

Never the one to sit idly, after the demise of her acting career, Millicent ran Millicent Deming Commercial Modeling Studio for several decades, and has been a licensed real estate agent in California for 37 years and is currently with Exclusive Estate Properties in Northern Hollywood. Millicent focuses on Pasadena, where she has lived for many years.

As for her civic life, Millicent served as Member of the Advisory Committee of The Pasadena Symphony among others. Sadly, Millicent and William divorced in the 1990s or 2000s. Millicent moved to La Canada-Flintridge after the divorce.

Wiliam T. Reynolds died on April 9, 2013 in San Gabriel.

Millicent Deming Reynolds lives in California today.

 

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