Millicent Deming

millicentdeming

Young, pretty Millicent Deming proved to be a more apt businesswoman than she was an actress – she worked in a modeling agency as a tutor from her late teens, and later was successful in real estate and had her very own modeling agency. too bad her acting career was so thin… Let’s find out more about her…

EARLY LIFE

Millicent Louise Deming was born on June 12, 1933, in Los Angeles, California, to Robert Edwards Deming and Mildred Fulton. Her father came from a progressive Iowa family – his older brother was William Edwards Deming, a prominent 20th century engineer, statistician, professor, author, lecturer, and management consultant. Robert worked as a super service station proprietor (I have no idea what it is, but it’s written like this on the 1930 census so go figure?)

Millicent grew up in a upper middle class family in Los Angeles, and discovered her love for acting from an early age. Here is a short article about her social life from the late 1940s:

Visitors Coming from Bel Air to attend the junior-senior prom at [shadow Mountain Club tonight is pretty Millicent Deming, who will be squired by Kenny Jackson of P. S. High. Miss Deming has taken junior parts in several movie shorts, one of which was shot down here at the airport with Kenny playing opposite her. She will he the house guest of Mrs. Mildred Jackson

Millicent became a successful businesswoman early in life, before she graduated from high school. Her father opened a modeling school where she worked as a instructor, giving girls lessons in how to be feminine and pose for the camera. On the side, she also worked as a secretary for famous impresario Nils Grauland, and did a nightly KTSL (2) show. She met the right people, and it was only a matter of time before she landed in Hollywood.

CAREER

Millicent’s first movie was Two Tickets to Broadway, the all too familiar musical with tons of unknown actresses playing chorus girls (I think that about 7 or 8 actresses I profiled here actually had an uncredited role in that movie). There is nothing much to say about it, it’s a lower mid tier musical with a moronic story, colorful cinematography and sadly forgettable music. Skip.

Millicent’s second, much better movie, was The Garment Jungle, a bag of mixed pleasures. Basically a racket movie, it’s part film noir with dramatic touches, a so-so mesh of it’s two directors – Vincent Sherman and Robert Aldrich. And boy, we can hardly find two such disparate directors!Sherman was known as a woman’s director in the vein of George Cukor – he excelled in melodrama and worked with great divas like Miriam Hopkins, Joan Crawford and Bette Davis. Robert Aldrich was the master of unseen violence, one of the few directors that showed what a phantom menace looks like. Combine them and you have an interesting experiment – not a completely successful one, mind you. The movie, which ended up begin completely unknown afterwards – has flashes of brilliance as much as some truly dismal parts. The story is nothing to gape about – racketeering in the garment district of New York – but it works as a framing device for some very relevant questions and punches you hard when you finally realize that those things happened in real life. Oh yes, people literary died in these rackets. The actors are a mixed bag too. There are wonderful actors like Lee J. Cobb and , and on the other hand, we have Kerwin Matthews in the lead, handsome enough but a total wooden pole. However, the atmosphere and the style overall is superb. There is much “angry silence”, menace and doom in the air, and you can easily feel that Robert Aldrich did a large portion of the movie. It’s his signature style – brutal yet always subtle. Sherman infuses the more “intimate parts”, and they are lacking compared to the rest of the movie. The female love interest, played by Gia Scala, is so marginal to the story it’s almost sad, and Matthews was too thin an actor to truly pull of the more challenging gentle scenes. If you could pull out the redundant cheesy side of the movie, It’s almost a wonderful film noir, and it’s a shame it so neglected today, despite it’s shortcomings.

Millicent did some TV work (Peter Gunn) before retiring from acting for good.

PRIVATE LIFE

Millicent was 5’ 6”, 34-23-34, blonde haired and hazel eyed. In 1951, at just 18 years old, Millicent was engaged to Serge Ross, a Hollywood stalwart. The engagement was terminated, and she was seen around town with well known attorney Milton Golden.

Millicent married John Anthony Restifo on May 5, 1953. Restifo was born on December 30, 1916, in Washington DC, to Thomas Charles Restifo and Madeleine DiCamillo. He was the oldest of four children (John, Joseph, Nancy and Margaret). His father, who ran a successful beverage business, died sometime in the late 1930s. His mother took over as the head of the business, running it with John and his brother Joseph. John moved to Los Angeles a few years later, along with his mother, and there met Millicent. Little is known of the marriage. They divorced in the late 1950s. Sadly, Restifo died in Mexico in 1964.

Millicent married her second husband, Jorge Ugalde, sometime after the divorce. Their son Mark was born on July 31, 1962 in Mexico City. They divorced in 1963 and Millicent returned to the US.

Millcent married, for the third time, to Gerald Fishbein on January 29, 1964. Fishbein was born on March 12, 1930, to Joseph Fishbein and Esther Levin. His younger sister Joan was born in 1940. His father was a successful jewelry salesman – they always had a servant in the household. His parents moved to New York not long after his birth. They lived in Queens where Gerald grew up. Gerald returned to California at some point.

Gerald adopted Mark, and Millicent and Gerald’s only child, daughter Leslie, was born on March 17, 1966. After living n Los Angeles with a lofty social life, Millicent and Gerald divorced on December 22, 1982. He married Emily S. Adehlson in 1985 and continued living in California.

Millcent married her third husband, William T. Reynolds, on April 6, 1985.  Born in Trenton, New Jersey, February 11, 1923, to parents William Titus Reynolds, Sr. and Mary Knode Reynolds, he attended schools in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Florida before moving to California following service in the Pacific Theatre during World War II. He was a graduate of the University of Southern California with a B.S. in Finance (Magna Cum Laude), and an M.B.A. He had a long career in financial services. While in graduate school, he was employed by Hill Richards & Co. in Los Angeles. In Pasadena, he was broker/manager at Blyth & Co., later Blyth Eastman Dillon, Paine Webber and, finally, UBS. He was a Past President of the Bond Club. Reynolds was married once before, to Mary Electa Nehman, and they had three daughters: Cornelia, (born on June 30, 1948), Electa (born on October 28, 1950), and Rosemary (born on May 12, 1953).

Never the one to sit idly after the demise of her acting career Millicent ran the Millicent Deming Commercial Modeling Studio for several decades, and has been a licensed real estate agent in California for 37 years and is currently with Exclusive Estate Properties in Northern Hollywood. Millicent focuses on Pasadena, where she has lived for many years.

As for her civic life, Millicent served as Member of the Advisory Committee of The Pasadena Symphony among others. Sadly, Millicent and William divorced in the 1990s or 2000s. Millicent moved to La Canada-Flintridge after the divorce.

Wiliam T. Reynolds died on April 9, 2013 in San Gabriel.

Millicent Deming Reynolds lives in California today.

 

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Georgia Clancy

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Stunning model who went to Hollywood hoping for fame and fortune, Georgia Clancy was one of many that never amounted to much in the movie world. Yet, after both her acting and modeling careers were over, she became a highly succesful executive and paved her own way in life. Let’s learn more about her!

EARLY LIFE

Georgia V. Clancy was born on October 10, 1924, in Sayre, Beckham County, Oklahoma, to Elmzey George Clancy and Mary Etta Hervey. She was the second of four children – her older brother was Alvin, born on February 19, 1923, and her younger siblings were Helen, born in 1931 and Mary, born in 1932. Both of her parents were native Oklahomans.

The family moved from Sayre, Oklahoma to Texas for a brief time in 1932, (her sister Mary was born there), then back to Oklahoma (San Francisco, Oklahoma, yep, that place really exists) and finally to Compton, California in 1936. Georgia’s father was a carpenter and had his own carpenters workshop – her mother helped manage it. Both Alvin and Georgia worked at the workshop since their early teens – by the time she was 16 years old, she racked up quite a bit of work hours per week.

wanting for a better life, Georgia decided to try her luck in New York, where she went after graduating from high school. Not long after she became a premier bathing suit model and was summoned to Hollywood for the movie Bitter Victory in 1948.

CAREER

Georgia landed in Hollywood in 1948, under this guise: “Georgia Clancy, America’s top bathing suit model who became a mannequin hoping it would lead to an acting career, recently reached second base in her campaign to become a screen actress. The beauteous redhead rounded first base in the self-same campaign last week when Paramount called her to play herself in fashion salon sequences for “Bitter Victory.” She was one of the premier New York models sent to Los Angeles – the others were Billie Fuchs, Maruja, Vivian Easton, Georgia, Yvette Koris and Gini Adams.

The movie never being made (a Bitter Victory movie was made later, in the 1950s, with Richard Burton), Georgia opted to stay in Los Angeles and actually made her Hollywood debut in Neptune’s Daughter, one of the better Esther Williams extravaganzas. What can I say – they were top of the art in terms of technical excellence and innovation, but did not have back then, nor now, any big artistic merit. But they are nice’n’easy viewing for an afternoon movie session.

In 1950, Georgia actually had a speaking role in Buccaneer’s Girl, a movie low-budget, thin plot and mid tier actors – but still despite al of this a very amusing movie. Yvonne de Carlo plays the female pirate (while never a big talent, and IMHO not a particularly beautiful woman – I know many will disagree with me on this, but I just don’t find her attractive, De Carlo was superb for these swashbuckler roles and had a certain charisma).

Georgia then appeared in two very good movies: The Furies  and September Affair. Both are examples of superb classic Hollywood filmmaking, despite their relative obscurity today. The first one is a interesting psychological western centering on a dysfunctional but passionate father/daughter relationship (between Barbara Stanwyck and Walter Huston – two top actors!!!!). The second movie is one of the bets tear-jerker I’ve even watched – this is how sad movies are done, people! The story has to be a bit far-fetched (otherwise you’ll never get the over-the-top drama much movies need), actors should be top-notch and truly earnest in their roles, the direction should be unobtrusive and slightly, and their shoudl be plenty of truly emotional moments. September affairs has all of this and one. Joan Fontaine and Joseph Cotten are wonderful in their roles. Gorgeous music (the song, September Affair, was sung by Walter Huston!!! Love that man!!) and great cinematography are a well-earned bonus. definitely put this on your watching list if you like it elegant and tragic.

Georgia’s last movie was the mediocre Two Tickets to Broadway, which I have reviewed to many times on this page to make it relevant anymore…

PRIVATE LIFE

When Georgia came to Hollywood in 1948, there were serious tried to make her more accessibe to the public by mentionign the frequently in incocequencial articles, like this one:

The legend that fashion models get their pick of handsome he-men is a lot of bunk, a green-eyed beauty said today. All she ever meets on the job is a flock of balding grandpas with romantic ideas.. Georgia Clancy, speaking. America’s highest-priced bathing suit mannequin. She has red hair and enough curves to keep a strapless swim suit from slipping. She’s also an expert at broken-field running. “You have to be quick,” says Miss Clancy with a shrug of her bare shoulders. “A lot of buyers get lonesome on out-of-town trips:” Georgia spends her working hours strutting her stuff before the delighted eyes of middle-aged executives. ‘ “We don’t have to date the visiting firemen if we don’t want to,” she explained. “But we have to be tactful in brushing them off. “When some homesick gent asks me out I usually smile and say, ‘oh, I’d love to, but mother expects me home for dinner.’ ” If she knows he’s married, it’s even easier. “I just hint,” she purred, “I’m certain his wife wouldn’t like my alienating his affections.” And she usually can tell a wolf before he even has time to make a pass. “Then I twist my signet ring around so it looks like a wedding ring,” she said. “It also helps to tell him I’m married to an all-American football tackle.” Miss Clancy’s in Hollywood with two other models for Producer Hal Wallis’ “Bitter Victory.” They have the same troubles she does…

After her Hollywood career evaporated Georgia returned to modeling. Sadly, in the 1950s not many women over the age of 35 worked as models, and the same applied to Georgia. However, she was far from disillusioned – she seeker her fortune elsewhere, became the number one executive of A.P. Management Corporation, run by the even interesting Al Petker. Taken from a newspaper article:

If radio isn’t dead yet and it isn’t much of the credit for keeping its pulse going can be claimed by Al Petker, known in the trade as The Contest Man. There can hardly be a man alive who has not heard a Petker-inspired contest on air.  He services some 8,500 disk jockey shows on 1,800 radio stations and also takes care of 119 TV stations with his two going enterprises: Gifts for Listeners and Gifts for Viewers. Whenever you hear a promotion contest on the air with a variety of prizes clocks, radios, watches being offered, you can take odds that it was Petker who dreamed up the idea and Petker who supplies the prizes. The prizes, literally thousands of them, are stored in a warehouse in Beverly Hills. It is, in fact, the only warehouse in Beverly Hills, a city which is very touchy about anything more commercial than selling mink stoles or poodle haircuts. He has his warehouse there, plus a luxurious swimming pool-home. He even maintains cordial relations with the Beverly Hills post office which handles an average of 2,000 Petker-pushed parcels every month and writes him fan letters about the nice way he wraps and addresses them

Petker, who only two years ago was flat broke, is today quite wealthy. Al’s income, of course, comes from the manufacturers of the products he gives away through the disk jockeys. They pay him an annual fee, in return for which he sees to it that the product is handsomely mentioned on the air in such a way that it not only doesn’t sound hike a commercial but doesn’t cost what a commercial would cost. He has, made a legitimate, good business out of what used to be (and in many Instances still is) a low earnign industry in the broadcasting business. When, for example, a comedian’s writers build a Joke or a sketch around some commercial products, such as a refrigerator, the writers are quietly rewarded by the refrigerator pee-pic. Petker is only 37; stands an even six-feet and is handsomely mustachioed. He lives , with his wife and two children and. an 8-month-old Russian wolfhound, and runs his A. P. Management Corp. (along with a dozen other related corporations) with the help’ of Georgia Clancy. Clancy, as she is invariably called, is his executive vice president and would be the hands-down winner of any contest for the most fetching executive v. p. in the world. But the Petker people have no interest in winning contests. They just like to run them. Pays better that way.

Georgia was by all accounts never married and the papers never mentioned a significant other.

Georgia Clancy died on March 8, 1981, in California.

Dorothy Dearing

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Dorothy Dearing was another dancer who broke into movies, but found little success in her new career, managing plenty of uncredited roles. However, after Dorothy turned her life around and remade herself for the second time, this time as a succesful businesswoman. Bravo to her! Now, let’s hear her story!

EARLY LIFE

Dorothy Dearing was born on April 17, 1913, in Parachute, Colorado, to Erdix Dearing and Elizabeth “Bessie” Wilson. Her father worked as a commercial inker. Her older brother, Erdix, was born in 1912, and her younger brother, Edward, was born in 1916. The family moved to Alhambra, California not long after Edward was born. Dorothy attended elementary and high school there.

Her father died in 1925. Her mother rented the house to tenants for some extra money, but in order to feed the family, both Erdix and Dorothy had to go to work. Erdix worked as a salesman in a drug store, and Dorothy was a dancing teacher (at only 16 years old!). Her love for dancing soon overrode everything else, and, after she graduated from high school, she set her sights to Hollywood and left for Los Angeles with her mother.

Dorothy was one of those actresses that didn’t land a contract right away, in fact, she danced in Busby Berekeley’s shows by night, worked as a secretary by day and went to as many auditions as she could, visiting tons of casting agents. One of them gave her a chance, she got a movie contract and started her career in 1933 for 20th Century Fox.

CAREER

Dorothy appeared unciedted in fluffy, happy-go-lucky musicals – Dancing LadyRedheads on Parade and Song and Dance Man. As she was a trained dancer, this was probably easy-peasy for her. All of these movies are no works of art, but are more than fun and nice on the eyes.

dorothydearing5Dorothy then turned to a bit more serious fare with Girls’ Dormitory, an insipid drama-romance about a (gasp) girls dormitory, with Simone Simon in the lead. Tyrone Power was a secundary male character then. Then, Dorothy took a year-long break from movies (I guess it was for martial reason, but can’t be sure), and returned in 1938. Her first movie was Alexander’s Ragtime Band – and guess who was the lead? Tyrone Power, of course, in one of his Alice face musicals. It’s a pretty good movie, especially interesting to nostalgia people. Dorothy then had her first credited role in Up the River, a likeable and lively comedy about con men who work their own football team (the story was remade later with Spencer Tracy). For more about Tail Spin, perhaps the pinnacle of Dorothy’s career, read the Private life section. It’s Stage door just swap acting with aviation. Dorothy then had another credited role in the mediocre drama Wife, Husband and Friend, one of the tons of Loretta Young movies from the 1930s (that almost nobody remembers today).

Dorothy then appeared in Hotel for Women, one of the best women’s movies of the 1930s, with the young Linda Darnell in the lead (who goes on to live in the hotel for women), and an impressive supporting cast to boot (Ann Sothern, Jean Rogers, Lynn Bari, June Gale)… A year later, Dorothy also appeared in the sequel – Free, Blonde and 21, and this time Lynn Bari had the cake!

Dorothy returned to musicals in the pastiche Hollywood Cavalcade (with Alice Faye in the lead, again), and the so-so biographical movie, Swanee River, about songwriter Stephen Foster. She then appeared in a rare Lynn Bari vehicle, City of Chance, a mid tier comedy/drama about a girl going to the big city so she can save her boyfriend from becoming a gambling addict.

Next up was the pale remake of Wizard of Oz – The Blue Bird, with Shirley Temple. Nothing special to see here, so skip unless you are a Shirley fan. Then there was Girl in 313, a typical B movie, blend of crime, heist and romance, with the evanescent Florence Rice in the lead, playing a jewel thief. It was followed by The Great Profile, a thin but highly amusing movie in which John Barrymore spoofs himself, playing an alcoholic former movie star. I like Barrymore – he was a superb if a bit overtly dramatic actor, but his last years were truly a study in a wasted life. Then Dorothy was in Murder Over New York, a mid tier Charlie Chan movie.

dorothydearing2Dorothy captured some roles in higher up movies with Hudson’s Bay, an epic movie about early Canada (with Paul Muni, truly a gem among actors!), Tall, Dark and Handsome, a well made comedy/crime film with Cesar Romero and Virginia Gilmore (too bad about her – she was a capable, good actress, but was overshadowed by her husband, Yul Brynner). Dorothy appeared in another Alice Faye movie, That Night in Rio – same old same old, shallow overall, but fun, elegant and pleasing. She continued with more musicals – The Great American Broadcast, another same old same old Alice Faye vehicle, Moon Over Miami, a surprisingly charming Betty Grable musical (I was more interested in Carole Landis, who plays Betty’s sister – she was truly a stunner!).

Dorothy last string of movies were crimes or dramas. She appeared in the lesser movie, We Go Fast, a completely forgotten Lynn Bari movie where she plays a waitress who falls for the wrong guy, and in a better one: I Wake Up Screaming, a top-tier film noir, with a solid story (watch it to see it!) and a cast of not very talented actors who actually give above-average-performances (for them at least). Neither Betty Grable nor Victor Mature knew how to act, but here it works. Dorothy’s last movie was Thunder Birds: Soldiers of the Air, another William Wellman aviation movie, a must see for fans of the genre and a good-enough movie for the rest of us.

PRIVATE LIFE

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In 1934, not long after she started her movie career, Dorothy gave a beauty hint for the readers:

Ten minutes daily for a period of a month in training the muscles of the abdomen will do much to help the not-so-perfect figure Simply contract and relax , the muscles, slowly and systematically, and after a while improvement should be evident.

It was noted that Dorothy was an excellent spokeswoman, one of Hollywood’s most attractive blondes, and that her favorite hot beverage was Bokar coffee, because its vigorous and winey aroma.  Dorothy was well known in Hollywood for her resemblance of both Madeline Carroll and Dorothy Mackaill. She was also part of the “in crowd” at 20th century Fox, as this article can attest:

Each noontime at Twentieth Century-Fox, four young stock actresses—Alice Armand, Dorothy Dearing, Irma Wilsen and Helen Erickson—lunch with ex­ star Mae Marsh and chatter like so many magpies. Having often wondered at such conversational pep, I finally mustered courage to ask Mae, pointblank, what they had talked about. “Well, said she, “Today we discussed (1) Alice Faye’s new hairdress, (2) the rumored romance of Sonja Henie and Alan Curtis, (3) the new composition stockings, (4) possible use of the same material for undies, (5) winter wardrobes and (6) three other things that are none of your business!” Guess femmes are femmes—even if they are actresses.

Dorothy’s only true claim to fame came when she went on the Tailsip publicity tour. A short article about it:

Tailspin party involves more than 5,500 miles of airline travel. In each key city visited the party will deliver prints of “Tailspin,” which stars Alice Faye, Constance Bennett and Nancy Kelly.  Some of the personalities to visit Detroit will include Ruth Nichols, famous speed pilot, who has established many of her air speed records right here, and Margo Bain Tanner, world’s holder title for a speed record. Others in the visiting party will include Dorothy Dearing, Joan Valerie, Lillian Porter and Helen Erickson, youthful stock actresses from the Twentieth Century-Fox studios. The fliers and Hollywood starlets will spend Saturday night and Sunday morning in Detroit. They’ll be guests at a buffet supper at 7 p. m. Saturday at the Book-Cadillac Hotel, together with Detroit and Michigan members of the Ninety-nine Club, officers from Pelfridge Field, civic dignitaries and newspaper men and women.

Sometime in the 1930s, Dorothy was married, but I could not find any information about the groom nor indeed how long did it last. What I do know that by 1940, she was divorced and living with her mother, Bessie, in Los Angeles. She also dated comedy writer Curly Harris for a time in 1937.

Dorothy made her last movie in 1942, and saw the writing on the wall. Always an independent, capable woman, she decided to go into business – import/export business, to be exact. By 1944, she was pretty well established in the Los Angeles biz world. Here is an article from 1944:

Dorothy Dearing. an importer, just back” from Mexico City, brought us aevaral packs of American-made cigarettes which she purchased there. One pack of Luckies (where the revenue tax stamp should be) is marked: “Best Wishes from, the Hit Parade and Joan Edwards.” Free cigarettes meant for our troops overseas. She paid 10 cents per pack! Miss Dearing and several friends bought them at the drug store in the Reforma Hotel, Mexico City. They are now in the mails to examination,

dorothydearingDorothy Dearing and former actor Roland Drew began dating in 1944, while he was still serving in the US Army. After a brief engagement, they married on August 12, 1946, in Los Angeles.

Roland was born, as Walter David Goss, on August 4,1900, in New York,  to David Goss and Elizabeth Kennedy. His father was English. Roland, in silent days, played opposite such stars as Dolores del Rio and Gloria Swanson. Later he was prominent as a character actor on the screen and in radio. He gave up acting by the time he married Dorothy. He enlisted as a private in September 1942 during World War II. This was his first marriage.

Their son Damon Dearing was born on April 13, 1947. Dorothy left acting for good by that time, and focused on her family and her import business. Drew became a renown dress designer in California, catering to the posh ladies, and was very famous and successful. IMDB alleges that Dorothy became an alcoholic, and this contributed to her premature death.

Dorothy Dearing Drew died on April 19, 1965, in Beverly Hills, California. Her widower, Roland Drew, died on March 17, 1988 in Santa Monica.