Harriette Tarler

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Beautiful women who crashed Hollywood only thanks to their looks and charms were plentiful, but rarely did they achieve anything worthwhile. Harriette Tarler, one of those women, did find her bit of fame with the Three Stooges shorts, but not much more. Let’s find out something about her!

EARLY LIFE

Harriette Gerthrude Hecht was born on November 4, 1920, in New York, to Adolph Hecth and Charlotte Reicher. Her parents were both Hungarian immigrants – her father worked as a furrier and wholesale fur merchant. Her older sister Beatrice was born in 1914.

The family moved to Los Angeles at some point, and Harriette graduated from high school there. She got married, had a family, and lived in Los Angeles until 1950, when she started her career (sorry, I don’t have any more info about this).

CAREER

Since my knowledge of the Three Stooges is very limited at best (I’ve never seen any of their movies or shorts, heck I can’t even name al three of them), I’ll simply skip Harriette’s claim to fame – her roles in Three Stooges shorts. She was the girl who got the pie in the face. For more information about her roles in the shorts, visit the fabulous Three Stoones site on this link.

Now, let’s take a look at some of her other acting achievements. Unfortunately, she was always uncredited and did no big service to the movies she appeared in… Thus, her career outside the Three Stooges shorts was a bit lackluster at best.

harriette-tarler-diana-darrin-arline-hunterIn 1957, she appeared in The Joker Is Wild, a surprisingly touching and nuanced biography of comedy legend Joe E. Lewis. Sinatra was in top form playing a man who was a personal friend for many years. Recommended! The next year Harriette was in The True Story of Lynn Stuart, a film noir about operatives going undercover, but with a whole new premise – the operative is a housewife, who, after her nephew died from a drug OD, decided to do something and help the police. it’s a low-budget movies and the cast is second tier, but it’s unusual, out of the ordinary and interesting.Next came The Party Crashers, a typical delinquent youth 1950s movies with Connie Stevens trying to choose between wild boy Mark Damon and nice guy Bobby Driscoll.

As Young as We Are was a rare B movie that tackled the student/teacher romance in the 1950s. While today you wouldn’t even flinch at the theme, back then it was dynamite and never shows in A budget movies. While this is a half-baked, lowly made film, make no mistake, the performances are good enough to warrant it a watching. Pippa Scott is pretty good in the female lead, and Robert Harland hits a right note as the highschool in love with his teacher.

The Buccaneer is an entertaining, fun, well made adventure movie. It’s not a classic nor is it a work of art, but it more than fulfills it’s promises. Yul Brynner is the eponymous buccaneer, and Anthony Quinn in the bad guy. Pirates, high seas, sword fights, pretty ladies, oh my!

Don’t Give Up the Ship is a typical Jerry Lewis comedy, this time on a ship and mocking naval 1d39cfee15d2cec41d1a805310b604e1beaurocracy. What can I say, if you like Jerry Lewis you’ll like this movie for sure. Since I’m not a fan (quite the opposite), I’ll just say no. The only reason I could find to watch this is the gorgeous Dina Merrill in the female lead role. Love Dina!!

Last Train from Gun Hill is a western that manages to outgrow that (IMHO) limited genre to become sa semi classic. it’s not as well-known today as some other staples of the genre like High Noon or 3:15 to Yuma, but it’s a sounding hit in almost al departments. Stalwart story (it starts like a run of the mill revenge story) that hides more depth than you think – check. Good actors – Kirk Douglas, Anthony Quinn, Carolyn Jones – check. Great cinematography – check. Suspenseful action scenes – check. Horses – check. Nothing else you need!

Harriette moved to New York and left movies behind for another career.

PRIVATE LIFE

Harriette was an interesting, colorful person with some major flaws. She was immensely charming and easily won people over. She also intrinsically understood how HOllywood worked, and knew that talent and beauty were not enough to gain fame – you needed a gimmick. Hers was being nicknamed Tiger and singing her autographs with a tiger paw next to her name. Long after her career ended, she moved to New York and decorated her apartment wholly in tiger print. She also wore tiger print silk dresses.

63627888_1460942147Harriette married  Leo M Schechtman on June 1939. Leo was born on April 20, 1916 in Chicago, Illinois, to Max and Lona Schechtman. Their daughter Stephanie Shelton was born on November 16, 1942. They divorced not long after her birth. Leo was allegedly a mean-spirited, tight-fisted man who never contributed anything to Stephanie’s well-being, even stole her the money Harriette gave her. He later remarried and had children. He died on March 4, 1990.

Harriette married for the second time to Arthur Tarler on November 3, 1951. Tarler was born on July 9, 1921, in Germany, to Siegmund Tarler and Regina Heimberg. He immigrated to the States in 1938, just before the start of WW 2. He lived with his maternal uncle in the Bronx, New York. Somehow he got to California in the mid 1940s and started a lighting fixture business. The marriage was short-lived, and here is an article about their August 1954 divorce:

Actress Harriette Tarler, 27, who now is engaged in a divorce contest with Arthur Tarler, 33, in the courtroom of Superior Judge Gordon Howden. Tarler, with Tobias G. Klin-ger as his counsel, had just withdrawn his cross-complaint charging mental cruelty, and was contesting only his wife’s claim to certain of their community assets. The husband is in the lighting fixtures business …
“I’m only beginning to see the light on this,” she told the court. Questioned by her attorneys, Henry J. Gross Jr. and Jacques Leslie, the actress said her husband stayed out nights until 4:30 or 5 in the morning. Her friend, Pauline Goddard, a fashion co-ordinator, corroborated her. She said that at a party one night someone complimented Mrs. Tarler, and “her husband immediately started belittling her.” The hearing will be resumed Monday.

So you get the drift, another messy divorce. But, that was the way divas did it back in the 1980s. Anyway, the two divorced and went on with their lives. Arthur remarried to Judith Rappapor, and had two children, Regine L, born on November 7, 1956, and Stacy J, born on January 30, 1959. Artur retired in the 1980 and went to live in Denver, Colorado, with his wife. He died there on August 23, 2009.

In 1958, Harriette left everything in Los Angeles (including Stephanie who was 16 years old) so she can move into the New York Plaza hotel suite, paid by her married boyfriend. Stephanie had to fend for herself (remembered, she was only a high schooler then) – the relationship between mother and daughter was strained (at best) after that. It seems that Harriette, for all of her immense charm and allure, was simply not a maternal woman. She was competitive, even with her own daughter, and too much of an egoist to really care about other people. Sadly, she never managed to outgrow this fatal flaw of hers, and both her daughter and her grandchildren felt it keenly.

10712698_742243325842384_7268080002787469464_nHarriette married her third husband, Roy Price Steckler on September 11, 1959, in Las Vegas, Nevada. Steckler was born on January 1, 1926, in New York, to Samuel and Stella Steckler. His father was a wealthy druggist and drug store owner – the family lived in Park Avenue and employed two servants in the 1930s. Little is known about the marriage and they divorced him in the 1960s.

Harriette became very testy about her age as time went by. She and Stephanie would travel to Las Vegas and double date as sisters (weird!!). She forbade her granddaughter to call her grandma, and her own daughter never refered to her as mom. Nobody was sure how old she really was, and she kept her true age a secret until the day she died.

Harriette found work as a telephone sex therapist in the 1980’s and 1990s. She would lie about her age, counsel her client, and demand payment via credit card. She owned a black cat called Tuthancamon, which looked like a a miniature panther, and she grew a rare breed of orchids in her apartment. She was excentric, larger than life and one of a kind, and people adored her, for all her bad sides. (much information about Harriette comes from her granddaughter Jessica Queller’s fabulous memoir! Jessica was a writer for Gossip Girl series, and she’s a true gem!)

Harriette’s health declined in the 1990s, and she spend more and more time in the hospital.

Harriette Tarler died on November 18, 2001, in New York City.

 

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Audrey Westphal

happychristmas

Sorry to say I couldn’t find a photo of Audrey Westphal, so I put a Piper Laurie happy Christmas photo. And thus, Happy Christmas!!! And now, let’s learn something more about the alluring Audrey…

EARLY LIFE

Audrey Lorraine Westphall was born on October 17, 1922, to James W. Westphall and Viola Moris, in Buffalo, New York. Her younger brother was named James Westphall, born in 1920. Her birth and death dates on IMDB are not correct – it states she was born in 1914, making her 30 years old at the time of her movie debut, which was a rare occurrence for starlets in Hollywood.

Audrey’s  father worked as a draftsman specializing in engines – her mother was a proprietor of the boarding house they lived in – they had one or two lodgers living with them at any time. Audrey grew up in Buffalo and attended high school there. She danced from early childhood, and this cemented her wish to become a professional dancer/actress.

Shortly before she graduated, she left Buffalo for New York in 1939, hoping to achieve some fame and fortune. In the meantime, her parents divorced and her mother went to New York to live with her. She got some Broadway work in panama Hattie, and this catapulted her to Hollywood. Her mother, naturally, followed.

CAREER

Audrey never landed in the credited tier, and she was always in blink and you’ll miss it roles, so it’s impossible to say if she was truly untalented or she just didn’t land the break she needed to showcase her skills. Anyway, Audrey’s first role was an uncredited one in Frenchman’s Creek, a fun high waters romp with a lady pirate in the lead (played by indomitable Joan Fontaine). Next, she appeared in another Joan Fontaine movie, The Affairs of Susan, a witty comedy about the already mentioned Susan and her relationship with three difference men (who all see her as a completely different woman). The best of the trio is George Brent, not a particularly magnetic leading man but a wonderful foil for strong female leads.

Audrey then appeared in a string go prestigious A movies. She first was Kitty, the lavish costume epic showcasing, first and foremost, the ravishing Paulette Goddard and her misadventures in the 18th century London. While Paulette was never a top actress, she had charm galore and could turn men into mush. Ray Milland is her capable support. Audrey then landed in a Betty Hutton movie, The Stork Club. I’m no big fan of Betty (I prefer more sophisticated actresses) but there is no denying she was an incredible dynamo and very amusing and her movies are likewise nice entertainment if nothing else.

Audrey’s perhaps most famous movie is The Blue Dahlia, one of the best film noirs ever made, with the indomitable teaming of Veronica Lake and Alan Ladd. Audrey’s last really important picture was Blue Skies. The story is pure schmoock, but when you have Bing Crosby+Fred Astaire+music by Irving Berlin, do you need any more? Certainty not! They dance, they sing, it’s all fun and games and it’s your typical 1940s musical. Some support is added by the beautiful but wooden Joan Caulfield and the more able Olga San Juan and Frank Faylen.

The rest of Audrey career was filled with mediocre movies. First came Dream Girl, with a surprisingly subdued Betty Hutton playing  a daydreaming girl who meets a stone cold realist (played by Macdonald Carey) who tries to shake her out of her stupor. While not a well remembered movie today, it’s a nice film with good performances.  That same year, Audrey was featured in Gypsy Holiday, a comedy short. Her last role was in Sealed Verdict, an unjustly overlooked post-WW-2 movie. it deals with tribunals of the higher echelons of the Third Reich army, and while it’s no Judgement at Nuremberg, it a surprisingly nuances movie with a sliding scales of gray morality so lacking in typical Hollywood lore. Ray Milland (once again) plays the council trying to establish the guilt or innocence of German General, played by John Hoyt. The incredibly beautiful Florence Marly plays a French peasant who testifies of some good deeds the General has done. Milland is left in highly ambiguous waters as he navigates a ruined country, just out of a terrible war and fraught with pessimism, bitterness and death. All in all, an above average movie. Hoyt takes the cake as the best actor – while Milland is his usual effective self, Hoyt has both the meaty role and the chops to pull it of.

Audrey decided to give up movies and focus on her growing family.

PRIVATE LIFE

While dancing in New York, Audrey met Lewis Hightower, another dancer. The married in 1940, when she was 17 years old. Lewis  Carlton Hightower was born on July 19, 1917, to Carlton Hightower and Nettie Owens. He moved to New York start a dancing career in the mid 1930s. His younger brother, William Hightower, would wed another dancer, the better known Vera-Ellen.

At first, the Hightower marriage was an idyllic one. However, more than aware that her daughter was young and inexperienced and wanting to help, Audrey’s mother came shuffling down from Buffalo and moved into their apartment. The honeymoon bliss ended. Things went south.

By October 1941, the Hightowers were reconsidering plans to get an annulment (met. married, separated and reconciled, all in one year). By late 1941, Audrey started to date Arthur Lewis, son of the “Banjo Eyes” producer, Al Lewis. There were rumors the two would center-aisle it when her decree was final. In February 1942, Arthur was spending his furlough time with Audrey and it was clear he was very serious about her.

However, Audrey could not get a divorce so easily. She later told the papers about a incident – Lewis found her dining delightedly with two other young gentlemen in a festive spot. Hightower supposedly was disturbed by this sight. He allegedly attempted to carry Audrey out of this festive center. But the two young gentlemen, according to the popular story, persuaded Mr. Hightower to unhand Mrs. Hightower and gave him a few assorted black eyes to balance things. Audrey left her husband in disgust. She also said her husband is tardy with her alimony and suggested jail. Typical Hollywood mumbo jumbo divorce. It went on and off for some time, but the divorce never came. Why? Well, because, tragically, Hightower died on September 2, 1943, another casualty of World War 2. He and Audrey were separated for a long time by then, but it was devastating for Audrey non the less.

As for Audrey’s relationship with Arthur, it lasted until August 1943, and that was the last we hear from the younger Lewis. Then, in 1944, Audrey met the man she was to marry.

She married her second husband, David Enton Friedkin, on March 31, 1945, in Los Angeles. David was born on on March 8, 1912, to Benjamin Friedkin and Anna Lapatin, in Kansas City, Missouri. her had an older brother, Morris, born in 1910. Both of his parents were Russian immigrants. Now, lets fast forward and say something about his career. Friedkin was a noted writer and director – he and his collaborator Mort Fine developed and produced the milestone series “I Spy” in association with Sheldon Leonard Productions. The duo wrote some of television’s most memorable scripts dating back to the first adult TV western. Frontier. They also wrote a number of movies, including “The Pawnbroker,” which won them the Writers Guild Award. As a director, Mr. Friedkin was probably best known for the Emmy-winning “The Price of Tomatoes,” which won him the Directors Guild Award. He directed many of the scripts which he wrote with Fine and which the pair produced, including the movies “Hot Summer Night” and “Handle With Care.”

Audrey and David had two children: Gregory Enton Friedkin, born on May 23, 1946, and Anthony Enton Friedkin, born on May 26, 1949.  By 1950 Her movie career over for sure, Audrey lived the high life in Beverly Hills with her husband, and they hosted many movers and shakers over the years. They were devoted Democrats and often had Democratic fundraisers at their home.

Their son Gregory became a actor/playwright, and hung out with the likes of Blackie Dammett, the famous  and father of Red Hot Chilli Peppers frontman, Anthony Kiedis. Thjeir other son, Anthony, became a noted photographer.

David died on October 15, 1976, in California from cancer. Audrey never remarried and lived the rest of her life in California.

Audrey Westphall Friedkin died on February 6, 1999, in Santa Monica, California.

PS – HAPPY CHRISTMAS!!!

 

 

Lucy Knoch

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A beautiful southern belle with a peaches-and-cream complexion, Lucy Knoch survived for over 10 years in the hostile climate of Hollywood, and none can dispute the fact that she accomplished a career much better than most starlets. Yet, she is miles away from standing toe to toe with proper actresses that left a mark on the film world.

EARLY LIFE

Lucy Claire Knoch was born on June 30, 1923, in DavidsonNashville, Tennessee, to Beverly and Annie Lee Knoch. She was the fourth of children – her older siblings were Beverly Louise, Horace and William, her younger siblings were Dorothy and Charles. Her father ran his own hardware shop.

She grew up in Nashville and attended school there. A lively, imaginative child, was active in school theatrics. In 1937, Lucy, then in the eighth grade students. and bunch of her classmates organized a program honoring the Constitution of the United States.

Lucy later told an interviewer Cordon Allemand the story of her childhood:

When Lucy become a model at the Hollywood Photographic Studio in the Nashville Arcade, never suspecting what the word “Hollywood” would someday mean to her future. Today this fortunate young lady, Lucy Knoch, it on her way to stardom at the Paramount Studios in the real Hollywood, which ia now her home. Lucy Knoch’s success story was related to me one afternoon in the living room of her home in Hollywood’s luxurious Alta Nido Apartments. Her warm Southern smile that’ makes you feel right at home is one of the first things I noticed about Lucy, and making me feel even more at ease was her genuine delight in learning that her interviewer was “homefolks” from back in Tennessee. “Honestly?” Lucy cried. “Why I was at Central High in 1939. I went to Woodbine grammar school out the Nolensville Pike. Nearly all my family live in Nashville and are in business there.” “Well just how did you get from Nashville to a Paramount contract?” I questioned. And this is Lucy’s story. “I suppose I was like lots of girls. All of us kids, my sister, Dorothy, and two brothers, William and Horace, went to Woodbine. I dreamed of being a movie star, but thought the nearest I’d .ever get to a stage was when I went to high school and joined the debating “team. A good one too, because we got several cups and ribbons.” She went on to tell of an early love for dancing and of being sent to dancing school three times a week. As a dancing team she and sister Dorothy appeared at many Tennessee festivals. Then came an end to school days and her first job. “I worked in the studio there for quite a while. Modeling. Maybe some of the Nashville people will remember me there. … Read the rest in the Profile section.

And she was in Hollywood in 1945, and started her career for Paramount.

CAREER

Lucy made her movie debut in The Affairs of Susan, a charming, well made Joan Fontaine vechicle. While no big brainer, it’s a delightful comedy with a good cast (Joan, George Brent, Dennis O’Keefe, Walter Abel). Lucy then continued to appear in movies of the same vein – decently made romance movies that never made it into the top category and are not that well-remembered today. Those are You Came Along (with Bob Cumings and Lizabeth Scott, an unusual but actually pretty good pairing), Incendiary Blonde and the short You Hit the Spot.

Then, Lucy’s career took an upswing and she stated to appear in some genuine classics. To Each His Own, Olivia de Havilland’s only Oscar win, The Blue Dahlia, one of the ultimate film noirs, and Blue Skies, a wonderful musical. 

lucyknoch5After reaching such a high point, there was a let down again, and she was back to the A budget mid tier movies. The first was Cross My Heart a True Confessions remake with Betty Hutton in the lead. The movie, a lackluster one ta best, still boasts a wonderful supporting cast – Michael Chekov, Iris Adrian and Howard Freeman. Sonny Tufts is his typical wooden  and Betty an energetic, fine performer, but no great actress.

Lucy then appeared in The Imperfect Lady, one of the rare Hollywood romances that goes for something slightly more mature. This is no fluffy, feel good, happy movie, and while it’s not a terribly dark movie either, it deals with some more tricky aspects fo the Victorian culture. Ray Milland and Teresa Wright lead a capable cast, and it’s generally a well dome movie, worth watching. Next came Welcome Stranger, a decent enough Bing Crosby/Joan Caulfield movie. What can I say about Crosby’s movies? Same old same old, but it certainly worked back then!

Lucy then appeared in the film noir classic, The Big Clock – now this is a movie more than worth your time! Slick, with a superb cast, nicely photographed and with an impeccable pacing, it takes a pretty simple story and makes it an intensive exercise in elegant filmmaking! Kudos for the always wonderful Charles Laughton as one heck of a villain, and to Ray Milland as the hero.

After appearing the short musical, Footlight Rhythm, Lucy was in Two Tickets to Broadway, a sub par Broadway pastiche musical. She then hit the jackpot again with The Bad and the Beautiful, one of the best outlooks on Hollywood that Hollywood ever producer (whoa, this is one difficult sentence)! Kirk Douglas plays the ultimate fight-dirty producer who’ll do ANYTHING to get what he wants.

lucyknoch3Lucy started 1953 with The Clown, a nostalgic, sentimental story about a professional clown who barely makes ends meet but can’t give it up since he has a son to support. Nice, touching, with the right degree of pathos, and Red Skelton is pretty good in the leading role. Next was Sabre Jet , an insipid movie about the men who flew combat aircraft known as Sabre Jets during the Korean War. This ain’t Top Gun people, and the characters and the story if thin at best. Robert Stack, never my favorite actor, never quite manages to make it work as a romantic lead.

Half a Hero is a mediocre movie about a pretty much everyday theme – normal couple Red Skelton and Jean Hagen decide to move the family from New York City to the suburbs. Trouble ensures. Lucy had the biggest role in her career in Executive Suite, a well made Her last movie in 1954 was Athena, a Jane Powell musical with a surprisingly modern outlook on food and lifestyle!

Lucy worked for a time for Red Skelton, and changed her name. She did some minor movie work: appeared in Anything Goes, the Marilyn Monroe movie Bus Stop  and the swashbuckler The Buccaneer. Under her original name, she made one more movie, Frank Sinatra’s The Joker Is Wild , before retiring.

PRIVATE LIFE

Here is everything you need to know about Lucy in short, as written in a newspaper from the 1950s:

Lucille Knox has been a movie fan since she was five years old. Her favorite dolls were named Greta Garbo and Norma Shearer. When she daydreamed herself a husband it was always Clark Gable. When Lucy was a teen-ager she and sister Dorothy drove from their hometown of Nashville, Tennessee, to visit relatives in Tucson, Arizona. At dinner one night in a local .-hotel their eyes almost popped out when they saw Paulette Goddard at a nearby table. Naturally Lucy asked for an autograph. Miss Goddard was cordial and said, “If you girls ever come to Hollywood look me up at Paramount.” Shortly after that Lucy and Dorothy arrived in Hollywood. “Miss Goddard,” they were told at the studio, “is in San Francisco.” “We were disappointed and hungry,” said Lucille. “A restaurant a block away caught my attention because of its name: Lucey’s. The place was jumping with movie stars. We met Everett Crosby, Bing’s brother. I told him that Paulette had promised to show us the Paramount studios. ” ‘Well,’ he said, ‘since Paulette Isn’t here, I’ll show you the studio and I’ll also introduce you to the casting director.’ He did. And we both were signed to a Paramount contract.”

Lucille and her sister were not popular with the other girls on the lot. “We were real naive. In all the fan magazines we’d read back in Nashville all you did in Hollywood was sat at a soda fountain or in a popular restaurant and you were discovered. We thought getting a contract on the first day was par for the course. We didn’t know that some of these kids had waited years for a break.” Another day, another restaurant. Lucille was having lunch at the Tail of the Cock. Red Skelton was at the next table. “Would you be interested in television work?” he asked. For two years Lucille was an important part of the Skelton show. M-G-M director Vincente Minnelli saw her on the show and gave her the part of Gilbert Roland’s steak-eating girl friend in The Bad and the Beautiful. After that she played Louis Calhern’s sexy girl friend in Executive Suite and a process-server in Esther Williams’ Athena. Lucille Knox was born Lucy Knoch. Red Skelton changed the Lucy to Lucille. And she herself recently changed the Knoch to Knox. She’s 5 feet 5′,inches tall, weighs 119 pounds and is married to an insurance man. Skelton once wrote an article about her titled, “The Young Lucille Ball.” She has been carefully avoiding Desi’g Lucy ever since. She figures she’s been lucky enough just being herself.

lucyknoch4However, what Hollywood didn’t know was that Lucy came to town as a married woman – she was wed to Michael Joseph Rose on September 11, 1941, in Davison, Tennessee. the newlywed had scarcely any time to enjoy their wedded bliss – Rose went into the army in October 1945. Rose was born in 1915, son of Tony and Marie Rose. Little else is known about him. The marriage was short-lived however, and they divorced sometime prior to 1945.

When Lucy first came to Hollywood, she gave another interview:

Lucy stayed on and has just signed a new contract. “It’s been wonderful here at Paramount,” she said. “When it was learned that we were two Southern girls alone in Hollywood, everybody from producers and directors on down helped and advised us. A Southern accent is no handicap when it comes to making friends. Everybody around the studio calls me ‘Honey Chile’ and ‘Tennessee’ and ‘Lucy Belle.’ And anybody from the South visiting the lot is rushed over to meet me.” “Nevertheless,” Lucy said, “I am trying to lose my Southern accent because you can’t play many roles with a Tennessee drawl.” AFTER she signed her contract Lucy’s days were occupied with a rigid training program, as they still are. As a member of the Paramount Starlet School she receives instruction in dramatics, diction, calesthenics, dancing. “I even had to learn to walk all over again.” she exclaimed. Also part of the training program has been Lucy’s appearance in IS major films. As a show girl, dancer, nurse, maid, Lucy has had experience before the camera. “It was a terrifying ordeal those first few weeks on the set. There are directors, assistant directors, cameramen, wardrobe women, scenery men, electricians, all watching you as if you were a trained seal going through your tricks. But I finally got used to it and don’t mind the shooting now.” Among the major films in which Lucy Knoch has appeared , are “Road to Utopia.” “Incendiary Blond.” “The Blue Dahlia.” “The Lost Weekend” and “Miss Susie Slagle’s.” Her newest pictures, all with Bing Crosby, are “Welcome Stranger,” “Blue Skies.” and “The Emperor’s Waltz.” Honey-haired Lucy is 23 years old. five feet six inches tall, and weighs 121 pounds. She plays golf and rides, but her favorite sport is fishing. ‘ With her husband, tall dark Nicholas Cancellieri (trucking-line owner whom she married in 1945), she spend most of her free moments deep-sea fishing off Catalina or Malibu. The starlet loves California but misses the neighborliness of her home town. “Here in California things are so big that your friends may be 20 or 30 miles away. And most of the time you scarcely have the opportunity to say more than “hello’ to the people in the neat apartment. It’s awful in a way. But you can’t have everything.” According to Paramount officials, however. Lucy Knoch does have everything, and it is easy to see why stardom for her is their prediction. And she seems to have Lady Luck on her side.

lucyknochlouiscalhernBut before he go farther, let’s look at her Hollywood private life. Lucy’s first serious beau in Hollywood was the former vaudeville star, Lyle Latell. He also dated starlet Beverly Thompson, so you can guess Lucy was not really a number one priority in his life. Then, she met THE MAN.

Lucy married Nicholas Cancellieri in 1945. He was a trucking company owner, as noted in the quote above. Nicholas was very supportive of his wife and her career, and she continued to act for more than a decade after the married. In the late 1950s, after being in Hollywood for 15 years, Lucy gave up her movie work to raise a family with Cancellieri.

Their first son, Jerry D., was born on August 1,1960. Their second son, Dominic, was born on October 19, 1964. The family lived in California.

Lucy Cancellieri died on July 22, 1990, in San Bernardino, California.